Full Spectrum CBD Tincture – Immunity

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Vitalita’s Immunity functional blend combines your daily intake of cannabinoids with synergistic herbal extracts. Made with full spectrum extract and our premium organic oil blend, this complex formula brings together the power of cannabinoids and herbs with nourishing, high quality oils.

Featuring Vitalita’s Immunity blend: Certified Organic or Wild Harvested Eleuthero, Astragalus, Ashwagandha, Reishi, Echinacea, Myrrh, Quina bark, Osha root, Lomatium root, Forsythia fruit, Cat’s Claw inner bark, Pau d’Arco bark, Lemongrass stalk, Oregano leaf, Turmeric, Umckaloabo, Liquorice, Red Ginseng and Bupleurum root.

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Vitalita’s Immunity functional blend combines your daily intake of cannabinoids with synergistic herbal extracts. Made with full spectrum extract and our premium organic oil blend, this complex formula brings together the power of cannabinoids and herbs with nourishing, high quality oils. With its rich concentration of vitamins, minerals, and antioxidants, this blend offers a host of valuable benefits for the body.

  • THC Remediated – Contains less than 0.3% THC.
  • Vegan + Gluten Free

Dosing

1 dropper full (1ml) once or more daily as desired.

Ingredients

  • Full Spectrum Hemp Extract
  • Beta-CP Complex
  • Vitalita Premium Organic Oil Blend
  • Vitalita Immunity Blend: Certified Organic or Wild Harvested Eleuthero, Astragalus, Ashwagandha, Reishi, Echinacea, Myrrh, Quina bark, Osha root, Lomatium root, Forsythia fruit, Cat’s Claw inner bark, Pau d’Arco bark, Lemongrass stalk, Oregano leaf, Turmeric, Umckaloabo, Liquorice, Red Ginseng, Bupleurum root.

About The Ingredients

Full Spectrum Hemp Extract

Full Spectrum Hemp Extract contains a synergistic variety of terpenes, cannabinoids, flavonoids and fatty acids all native to the hemp plant, with the THC remediated to below the legal limit of 0.3%. These beneficial arrays of compounds work together synergistically in an entourage to provide all the complex benefits of whole hemp with the ensured formulated benefit of staying under 0.3%.

Beta-CP Complex

Vitalita’s unique Beta-CP Complex is an optimal blend of Copaiba Oil, Clove, Black Pepper, and Lemon Oil, which together, compliment the body’s natural response mechanisms, aids in absorption, and acts as a natural preservative.

Vitalita Premium Organic Oil Blend

Vitalita’s Premium Organic Oil Blend is a combination of organic hemp seed oil, organic MCT oil, organic grapeseed oil, organic avocado oil, pumpkin seed oil and amaranth oil. Click an ingredient below to read more about it.

Hemp oil contains large amounts of omega-6 and omega-3 fats, which are two types of unsaturated fats, or “good fats,” and all nine essential amino acids, the materials your body uses to make protein. Some studies show that its nutrients and minerals can contribute to better skin, heart health and reduced inflammation.

Grapeseed Oil is made from the berries of Vitis Vinifera L. Sativa grapes which produce a carrier oil rich in vitamin E, omega fatty acids, with high antioxidant potency, including resveratrol and quercetin, offering a host additional benefits for the body.

Medium-chain triglyceride (MCT) oil contains medium-length chains of fats called triglycerides. Due to their shorter length, MCTs are more easily digested than longer-chain fatty acids found in many other foods. MCT is a good energy source that can also help promote weight loss.

Avocado oil has numerous benefits, largely related to its content of antioxidants and healthy fats. It reduces cholesterol and blood pressure, and improves heart health and helps enhance the absorption of other nutrients. It can also help to combat oxidative stress and boost antioxidants to fight cellular damage.

Pumpkin seed oil—also called pepita oil—is the oil extracted from the seeds of a pumpkin. Also known as “green gold”, organic pumpkin seed oil has a pleasant and mild flavour. Its high antioxidant content helps reduce inflammation. Study-proven uses for pumpkin seed oil include lowering cholesterol, easing symptoms of benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) in men, reducing hot flashes and hormone-related headaches in women. Pumpkin seed oil has been linked to positive effects on hair growth, especially in men.

Amaranth is an ancient grain that was an important part of the aztec diet due to its high nutrition. Amaranth oil’s high omega-3 and omega-6 content helps combat aging and inflammation. Rich in squalene, it is studied for its ability to boost immunity and protect the body from the damaging free radicals. When squalene and water fuse oxygen is released into our body’s cells to stimulate natural metabolism and boost immunity. Amaranth oil is also studied for its ability to lower cholesterol, fight diabetes and aid weight loss. 

Vitalita Sleep + Relax Blend

Eleuthero, also known as Siberian ginseng, is native to parts of Russia, northern China, Korea, and Japan. The root and the rhizomes (underground stem) are medicinal. 

It is best known for being an adaptogen, an immune booster, and a stimulant. It is also suggested that it improves cognitive functions, supports strong bones and muscles, lowers blood pressure, and helps heal wounds. 

Eleuthero is a natural stimulant. It contains compounds that help to prevent and overcome chronic or severe fatigue and generally boost energy levels. Studies show that it also increases the ability of muscles during physical activity.[1] In traditional medicine, Eleuthero is used to increase bone and muscle strength. 

The plant can be used to increase circulation. By increasing blood flow to the brain, Eluthoro can help improve cognitive functions, like concentration and memory. 

Eleuthero is also used to help heal wounds. It does so by boosting the immune system and speeding up the healing process. [2]

Interactions – Alcohol, Digoxin, Anticoagulant / Antiplatelet drugs, Antidiabetic drugs, Cytochrome P450 1A2 (CYP1A2) substrates, Cytochrome P450 2C9 (CYP2C9) substrates, CNS depressants, LithiumAlcohol can cause sleepiness and drowsiness. Siberian ginseng might also cause sleepiness and drowsiness. Taking large amounts of Siberian ginseng along with alcohol might cause too much sleepiness.

Digoxin (Lanoxin) helps the heart beat more strongly. One person had too much digoxin in their system while taking a natural product that might have had Siberian ginseng in it. But it is unclear if Siberian ginseng or other herbs in the supplement were the cause.

Siberian ginseng might slow blood clotting. Taking Siberian ginseng along with medications that also slow clotting might increase the chances of bruising and bleeding. Some medications that slow blood clotting include aspirin, clopidogrel (Plavix), diclofenac (Voltaren, Cataflam, others), ibuprofen (Advil, Motrin, others), naproxen (Anaprox, Naprosyn, others), dalteparin (Fragmin), enoxaparin (Lovenox), heparin, warfarin (Coumadin), and others.

Siberian ginseng might affect blood sugar, either lowering or increasing blood sugar levels. Diabetes medications are also used to lower blood sugar. Taking Siberian ginseng along with diabetes medications might cause your blood sugar to go too low or cause your diabetes medication to be less effective. Monitor your blood sugar closely. The dose of your diabetes medication might need to be changed.Some medications used for diabetes include glimepiride (Amaryl), glyburide (DiaBeta, Glynase PresTab, Micronase), insulin, pioglitazone (Actos), rosiglitazone (Avandia), chlorpropamide (Diabinese), glipizide (Glucotrol), tolbutamide (Orinase), and others.

Some medications are changed and broken down by the liver. Siberian ginseng might decrease how quickly the liver breaks down some medications. Taking Siberian ginseng along with some medications that are changed by the liver might increase the effects and side effects of some medications. Before taking Siberian ginseng talk to your healthcare provider if you take any medications that are changed by the liver. Some of these medications that are changed by the liver include clozapine (Clozaril), cyclobenzaprine (Flexeril), fluvoxamine (Luvox), haloperidol (Haldol), imipramine (Tofranil), mexiletine (Mexitil), olanzapine (Zyprexa), pentazocine (Talwin), propranolol (Inderal), tacrine (Cognex), theophylline, zileuton (Zyflo), zolmitriptan (Zomig), and others.

Some medications are changed and broken down by the liver. Siberian ginseng might decrease how quickly the liver breaks down some medications. Taking Siberian ginseng along with some medications that are broken down by the liver can increase the effects and side effects of some medications. Before taking Siberian ginseng, talk to your healthcare provider if you take any medications that are changed by the liver. Some medications that are changed by the liver include amitriptyline (Elavil), diazepam (Valium), zileuton (Zyflo), celecoxib (Celebrex), diclofenac (Voltaren), fluvastatin (Lescol), glipizide (Glucotrol), ibuprofen (Advil, Motrin), irbesartan (Avapro), losartan (Cozaar), phenytoin (Dilantin), piroxicam (Feldene), tamoxifen (Nolvadex), tolbutamide (Tolinase), torsemide (Demadex), warfarin (Coumadin), and others.

Siberian ginseng might cause sleepiness and drowsiness. Medications that cause sleepiness are called sedatives. Taking Siberian ginseng along with sedative medications might cause too much sleepiness. Some sedative medications include clonazepam (Klonopin), lorazepam (Ativan), phenobarbital (Donnatal), zolpidem (Ambien), and others.

Siberian ginseng might have an effect like a water pill or “diuretic.” Taking Siberian ginseng might decrease how well the body gets rid of lithium. This could increase how much lithium is in the body and result in serious side effects. Talk with your healthcare provider before using this product if you are taking lithium. Your lithium dose might need to be changed.

[1]https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/21793317/
[2]https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/30000865/

Traditional Chinese medicine has included the use of Astragalus for centuries. The plant stimulates the spleen, liver, lungs, circulatory, and urinary system. The plant is believed to prolong life and is used for its many health benefits, including anti-inflammatory and anti-aging effects and its immune-boosting abilities. 

Astragalus is said to tonify the “spleen” and is employed to treat fatigue linked to decreased appetite. This function is also why it is utilized to treat the common cold, allergies, upper respiratory infections, fibromyalgia, diabetes, and heart disease. [1] 

Astraglus also strengthens and regulates the immune system. Topical use of Astragalus is promoted for improving blood flow and assisting in wound healing.[2]

Interactions – Astragalus interacts mildly with immunosuppressive medication, acyclovir, echinacea, and maitake. Do not take if pregnant or breastfeeding. 

[1]https://vedicpaths.com/astragalus-herb/
[2]https://www.nccih.nih.gov/health/astragalus

Ashwagandha, also known as Indian Ginseng, has been used for thousands of years in Ayurvedic practices – one of the world’s oldest medicinal systems. Ashwagandha is a Medhya Rasayana which is the ayurvedic category of food and nutrients that promote learning and memory.

The roots and berries of the plant are concocted into tonics that boost energy and reduce stress and anxiety. It is also used for fatigue, pain, skin conditions, heart conditions, osteoporosis and arthritis, diabetes, high cholesterol, epilepsy, Alzheimer’s and dementia, and even cancer. 

Ashwagandha’s adaptogenic properties reduce depression, anxiety, stress and lower cortisol levels. The plant is also known to be anti-inflammatory. Chronic stress and inflammation can lead to other serious health issues.

Ashwagandha contains steroidal compounds, including the lactones Withaferin A and carbon-27-glyco withanolides, known collectively as Withanolides. It also contains a fair amount of alkaloids; tropine, pseudotropine isopelletrine, anaferine, and saponins.[1]

[1]https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3252722/

Interactions – Immunosuppressants, Benzodiazepines, CNS depressants, Thyroid hormone

Immunosuppressants – Ashwagandha seems to increase the immune system. Taking ashwagandha along with medications that decrease the immune system might decrease the effectiveness of medications that decrease the immune system.Some medications that decrease the immune system include azathioprine (Imuran), basiliximab (Simulect), cyclosporine (Neoral, Sandimmune), daclizumab (Zenapax), muromonab-CD3 (OKT3, Orthoclone OKT3), mycophenolate (CellCept), tacrolimus (FK506, Prograf), sirolimus (Rapamune), prednisone (Deltasone, Orasone), corticosteroids (glucocorticoids), and others.

Sedative medications – Benzodiazepines – Ashwagandha might cause sleepiness and drowsiness. Drugs that cause sleepiness and drowsiness are called sedatives. Taking ashwagandha along with sedative medications might cause too much sleepiness. Some of these sedative medications include clonazepam (Klonopin), diazepam (Valium), lorazepam (Ativan), and others.

Sedative medications – CNS depressants – Ashwagandha might cause sleepiness and drowsiness. Medications that cause sleepiness are called sedatives. Taking ashwagandha along with sedative medications might cause too much sleepiness. Some sedative medications include clonazepam (Klonopin), lorazepam (Ativan), phenobarbital (Donnatal), zolpidem (Ambien), and others.

Thyroid hormone – The body naturally produces thyroid hormones. Ashwagandha might increase how much thyroid hormone the body produces. Taking ashwagandha with thyroid hormone pills might cause too much thyroid hormone in the body, and increase the effects and side effects of thyroid hormone.

The Reishi mushroom is a fungus that grows in various hot and humid locations in Asia. For centuries, it has been a staple in Eastern medicine. Reishi mushrooms have a number of health benefits. They boost the immune system, fight inflammation, assist with blood pressure and cholesterol, support healthy liver function, battle fatigue, ease depression, and even fight cancer. 

Reishi mushrooms are highly antioxidant, protecting the body from free radicals such as air pollution, radiation, and bacteria. They also enhance the function of the immune system by increasing the activity of white blood cells, which help fight infection in the body. 

Chronic inflammation is responsible for many health issues. Well known for its anti-inflammatory effects, Reishi can be applied orally or topically to help the body battle inflammation. Topically, it is as effective as the hormone cortisol, found in many topical medications, to treat skin conditions.[1]

Reishi is used to control blood pressure and cholesterol. The mushrooms have a natural ability to lower blood pressure because they increase blood flow. Reishi is also known to lower bad cholesterol and boost good cholesterol. These effects help prevent strokes, clogged arteries, and other heart problems. Studies show that Reishi  can even reverse the effects of heart disease. [2]

Reishi  can fight harmful immune responses that can slow down liver function. In addition, the adaptogenic properties of Reishi help get rid of toxins and waste from the body, helping the liver do its job. 

Reishi is even beneficial for fighting cancer. In Traditional Chinese Medicine, Reishi improves stamina, increases strength, and prolongs life in cancer patients. Its immune-boosting properties help weakened cancer patients. The mushrooms also ease the side effects of chemotherapy.[3]

Interactions – Anticoagulant / Antiplatelet drugs, Antihypertensive drugs

High doses of Reishi mushrooms might slow blood clotting. Taking Reishi mushrooms along with medications that also slow clotting might increase the chances of bruising and bleeding. Some medications that slow blood clotting include aspirin, clopidogrel (Plavix), diclofenac (Voltaren, Cataflam, others), ibuprofen (Advil, Motrin, others), naproxen (Anaprox, Naprosyn, others), dalteparin (Fragmin), enoxaparin (Lovenox), heparin, warfarin (Coumadin), and others.

Reishi mushrooms might decrease blood pressure. Taking Reishi mushrooms along with medications for high blood pressure might cause your blood pressure to go too low. Some medications for high blood pressure include captopril (Capoten), enalapril (Vasotec), losartan (Cozaar), valsartan (Diovan), diltiazem (Cardizem), Amlodipine (Norvasc), hydrochlorothiazide (HydroDIURIL), furosemide (Lasix), and many others.

[1]https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/19651243/
[2]https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/21801467/
[3]https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3585368/

Echinacea, also known as Black Susans or Purple Coneflower, is one of the most popular herbs worldwide. Indigenous communities have used it for centuries to treat various health issues. Today, it’s best known as an immune booster and a herbal remedy for the common cold or flu. However, it’s also applied to treat pain, inflammation, migraines, and other health issues.

Echinacea is best known for its positive effects on the immune system. Several studies have found that this plant helps immune systems combat infections and viruses, which allows the body to recover more quickly from illnesses.[1]

High blood sugar can increase your risk of severe health problems. This includes type two diabetes, heart disease, and several other chronic conditions. Studies have found that Echinacea may help lower blood sugar levels.[2]

Echinacea has emerged as a possible treatment for anxiety. Research has found that echinacea plants contain compounds including alkamides, rosmarinic acid, and caffeic acid, which may lessen anxiety feelings.[3]

Several studies have indicated that echinacea can help reduce excess inflammation. In one study, echinacea compounds helped reduce important inflammatory markers and memory loss caused by inflammation. Echinacea can also help skin conditions such as eczema and acne because of its anti inflammatory effects.[4]

Studies show that Echinacea may repress cancer cell growth and even trigger cancer cell death. It is thought that this is due to Echinacea’s immune-boosting properties.[5]

Interactions –  Do not use if you have an autoimmune disorder such as rheumatoid arthritis, lupus, or psoriasis. Ask a doctor before using Echinacea if you are pregnant or breastfeeding. Echinacea should not be given to children younger than twelve years old.

[1]https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/23195946/
[2]https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/28061036/
[3]https://www.nutraingredients-usa.com/Article/2020/01/03/Echinacea-extract-shows-mild-anti-anxiety-effects-in-RCT 
[4] https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/28003341/
[5]https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/22971663/

Myrrh is distilled from the reddish-brown resin of a tree that is native to northeastern Africa and southwest Asia. Myrrh has long been used in Ayurvedic and Traditional Chinese Medicine, and its use is continued today to treat many ailments, including pain and infections. Myrrh is anti-inflammatory, anti-bacterial, and antiseptic. The powerful herb helps to heal wounds, ease pain, and is a potent antioxidant. 

Studies suggest that Myrrh can directly kill bacteria. It also boosts the immune system to help it produce white blood cells, which in turn help eliminate bacteria.[1] In ancient times, places of worship were purified and the air cleaned by burning Myrrh incense to prevent the spread of contagious diseases, including those caused by bacteria.[2] Some studies have revealed that Myrrh has strong effects against several infectious bacteria, including some drug-resistant ones.[3]

When applied topically, Myrrh promotes wound healing and fights microbes that can cause infections. It may also (deter) the growth of skin fungi, including ringworm and athlete’s foot. It has also been suggested that Myrrh may help treat some common parasites.[4]

Myrrh is used to treat pain issues, such as headaches, because it contains plant compounds that may temporarily relieve pain by signalling your brain that you’re not in pain. It may also block your body’s production of inflammatory chemicals that lead to swelling and pain.[5]

Interactions – Antidiabetes drugs and Warfarin (Coumadin) reacts with Myrrh.

Myrrh might decrease blood sugar. Diabetes medications are also used to lower blood sugar. Coumadin is used to slow blood clotting.

[1]https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/23961070/ 
[2]https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/29530608/
[3]https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/25027570/
[4]https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5435909/
[5]https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/22020140/

Quina Bark comes from the Cinchona tree. This tree is native to Peru and has become widely popular for its medicinal uses. 

First used by the indigenous people, its benefits first became apparent to the broader world when Jesuits in colonial Peru learned of the locals using Quina Bark to treat fevers. They began to create medicines by powdering the bark and treated malaria patients with it starting in the 1630s. The bark contains the alkaloid quinine, an effective antimalarial agent.[1]

Today, Quina Bark is used for a variety of ailments including blood and heart disorders such as varicose veins, anemia, and arrhythmia. The drug contained in Quina Bark that has these cardiac effects is called quinidine.[2]

Quina Bark is used to treat various digestive issues such as increasing appetite, promoting the release of digestive juices, dyspepsia, gastrointestinal disorders, gallbladder disease, and others. 

This powerful bark numbs pain, kills germs, and is an astringent. It is used for blood vessel disorders, including hemorrhoids, varicose veins, and leg cramps. Some people use Quina Bark for fever,  mild influenza attacks, colds, malaria, throat disease, and cancer.[3]

Interactions – Anticoagulant / Antiplatelet drugs, Quinidine, Quinine, Phenobarbital, CarbamazepineCinchona might slow blood clotting. Taking cinchona along with medications that also slow clotting might increase the chances of bruising and bleeding. Some medications that slow blood clotting include aspirin, clopidogrel (Plavix), diclofenac (Voltaren, Cataflam, others), ibuprofen (Advil, Motrin, others), naproxen (Anaprox, Naprosyn, others), dalteparin (Fragmin), enoxaparin (Lovenox), heparin, warfarin (Coumadin), and others.

Cinchona contains quinidine. Taking quinidine along with cinchona can increase the effects and side effects of quinidine and cause heart problems. Do not take cinchona if you are taking quinidine.

Cinchona contains quinine. Taking quinidine along with cinchona can increase the effects and side effects of quinine and cause heart problems. Do not take cinchona if you are taking quinine.

Cinchona contains quinine. Quinine might increase how much phenobarbital (Luminal) is in the body. Taking cinchona with phenobarbital might increase the effects and side effects of phenobarbital.

The body breaks down carbamazepine to get rid of it. Cinchona contains quinine. Quinine can cause the body to break down carbamazepine (Tegretol) too quickly. Taking cinchona along with carbamazepine (Tegretol) can decrease the effectiveness of carbamazepine (Tegretol).

[1]https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5298425/
[2]https://www.researchgate.net/publication/281572815_Cinchona_Cinchona_sp
[3]https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3121651/

In many Native American cultures, Osha is called “bear root” or “bear medicine.” According to stories of the Dine people, the brown bear used the Osha roots medicinally. The bear would eat the roots and rub them onto its fur. The Dine credit the bear with leading them to powerful medicine.[1]

Osha root is indeed a powerful medicine. It treats respiratory illnesses, sore throats, and lung diseases, fights oxidative stress and inflammation, and is a powerful protector against infection. 

Osha roots fight oxidative stress. Osha root is high in antioxidants that fight free radicals or unstable molecules that cause oxidative stress in your body. This is how Osha root battles oxidative stress. Oxidative stress is related to chronic inflammation and an increased risk of illnesses, including heart disease, Alzheimer’s, and cancer.

Osha root extract and its plant compounds have antimicrobial effects, which may help protect against infection. It is applied topically as a wound disinfectant. It also treats some viral diseases, such as hepatitis.[2]

Studies show Osha root to be particularly effective against numerous bacteria, including Staphylococcus aureus, E. coli, Enterococcus faecalis, and Bacillus cereus. Osha root also has potent antifungal properties. [3]

Interactions – It’s unsafe to take osha if you are pregnant. It might start menstruation, and this might cause a miscarriage. Avoid use.

[1] Cowen, Ron. 1990. “Medicine on the wild side; animals may rely on a natural pharmacy.” Science News. 138: 280-2; Terrell, Bernadette, and Anne Fennell. 2009. “Oshá (Bear Root): Ligusticum porteri J.M. Coult. & Rose var. porteri”. Native Plants Journal.10 (2): 110-117.
[2] https://www.liebertpub.com/doi/abs/10.1089/act.2010.16308
[3]https://www.healthline.com/health/antifungal-essential-oils

Lomatium Root is also known as Biscuit Root as it was used by North American indigenous people who made a type of flour from it. The seeds were eaten raw or roasted or ground into flour for baking. The indigenous people also knew that it was instrumental in treating infections, especially those that concern the lungs. 

Lomatium was used, particularly in the southwestern United States, during the influenza pandemic of 1917 with reportedly good results. The plant’s root was also used in smoking mixtures during rituals where healers used the smoke to treat respiratory infections. Lomatium was used when the indigenous people were exposed to tuberculosis and other diseases that Europeans brought to North America.

Lomatium Root continues today to treat acute and chronic viral, bacterial, and fungal infections and other inflammatory disorders of the respiratory system. It is commonly used to treat cough, cold, flu, pneumonia, mononucleosis, bronchitis, tuberculosis, seasonal allergies, and asthma. Lomatium is also known for boosting the immune system and reducing inflammation. 

Location is also used to treat skin infections, cuts, sores, sprains, and broken bones. It is even thought to treat fibromyalgia, a muscular inflammatory condition, as the cause is thought to be connected to viruses. 

It is most useful when given as treatment early and in small, frequent doses. 

The plant is native to western North America and is potentially threatened in some parts of its habitat, so it should not be picked from the wild without consulting local experts familiar with the plant.[1]

Interactions – There are no known interactions with Lomatium. 

[1]https://www.peacehealth.org/medical-topics/id/hn-2126009

The Forsythia tree blooms in the spring and is easily identified by its bright yellow flowers. Its fruit, a small nut-like capsule, has been used for its medicinal benefits for centuries. It is called Lian Qiao, and it is one of the oldest ingredients in traditional medicines. 

Forsythia Fruit is used to treat bacterial and viral infections. It also has anti-inflammatory properties. It treats tuberculosis, tonsillitis, sore throat, fever, nausea, heart disease, HIV/AIDS, inflammation, erysipelas, and many other health issues. Forsythia Fruit is even being studied for treating certain cancers.[1] 

Reviews show that this fruit fights against harmful bacteria such as staphylococcus aureus, E. coli, and streptococcus.[2] 

Several studies have found forsythia fruit is beneficial for fighting viruses. It was found that when working against the influenza virus, the fruit stops the virus from multiplying and boosts immune cell function.[3]

Forsythia fruit works very well for treating inflammation. It is applied to treat pain and swelling and more severe inflammation conditions, such as ulcerative colitis.[4]

Interactions – Medications that slow blood clotting (Anticoagulant / Antiplatelet drugs)

Forsythia might slow blood clotting. Taking forsythia along with medications that also slow clotting might increase the chances of bruising and bleeding.

Some medications that slow blood clotting include aspirin, clopidogrel (Plavix), diclofenac (Voltaren, Cataflam, others), ibuprofen (Advil, Motrin, others), naproxen(Anaprox, Naprosyn, others), dalteparin (Fragmin), enoxaparin (Lovenox), heparin, warfarin (Coumadin), and others.

[1]https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4262507/
[2]https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/28887216/
[3]https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7108588/
[4]https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/28502906/

Cat’s Claw is a vine plant that grows in the rainforest in central and south America. The bark of the vine has many medicinal benefits. Two types of Cat’s Claw are used for medicine. Uncaria guianensis is used in Europe, and Uncaria tomentosa is used in North America. 

Cat’s Claw Stimulates the immune system, helping the body fight illness and combat viral infections. Some people use Cat’s Claw for viral infections, such as cold sores, shingles, and AIDS.[1]

Cat’s Claw is commonly used to treat osteoarthritis and rheumatoid arthritis. It is also used for various digestive system disorders, including swelling and pain of the large intestine, inflammation of the lower bowel, inflammation of the lining of the stomach, ulcers, hemorrhoids, and other issues. Cat’s Claw may even kill cancer cells and reduce tumors.[2]

Interactions – Auto-immune diseases such as multiple sclerosis (MS), lupus (systemic lupus erythematosus, SLE), or other similar conditions: Cat’s Claw might cause the immune system to become more active. This could increase the symptoms of auto-immune diseases. If you have one of these conditions, it’s best to avoid using Cat’s Claw without consulting your healthcare provider.

Bleeding disorders: Cat’s Claw might slow blood clotting. There is concern that Cat’s Claw might increase the risk of bruising or bleeding in people with bleeding disorders.

Low blood pressure: There is some evidence that Cat’s Claw might lower blood pressure. If your blood pressure is already low, this might be a problem.

Leukemia: Cat’s Claw might worsen this condition. Don’t use it if you have leukemia.

Surgery: There is a concern that Cat’s Claw might make blood pressure control difficult during surgery. Stop taking Cat’s Claw at least two weeks before a scheduled surgery.[3]

[1]https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/19451609/
[2]https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3395261/
[3]https://www.webmd.com/vitamins/ai/ingredientmono-395/cats-claw

 

Pau d’Arco bark is the inner bark of Tabebuia trees that grow in central and South American rainforests. It has many healing attributes and has long been used to treat illnesses. 

Pau d’Arco bark contains a powerful antioxidant known as quercetin. Quercetin is one of the most abundant antioxidants in our diets. It plays an essential role in assisting your body in combating damage from free radicals, which can lead to chronic diseases. The bark is also rich in naphthoquinones, plant-based compounds that exercise antiviral, antibacterial, and antifungal effects.[1]

Pau d’Arco bark has antibacterial and antifungal properties due to the ability of the extract to hinder the processes bacteria and fungi need to produce oxygen and energy.[2]

The bark extract is antiviral and provides a shield against several disease-causing organisms, and may also repress the growth of infectious bacteria in your digestive system.[3]

Several studies demonstrate that Pau d’Arco extract inhibits the release of specific chemicals that cause an inflammatory response in your body. Due to this, this supplement may help treat inflammatory conditions like osteoarthritis, which causes swelling, pain, and stiffness in your joints. Studies also show that Pau d’Arco extract inhibits pancreatic lipase, an enzyme that helps your body digest and absorb dietary fat. This is how s works for weight management.[4]

In some early testing, compounds in Pau d’Arco were found to inhibit tumor growth and help fight cancer.[5]

Interactions – Pau d’arco has no known severe interactions with other drugs.

[1]https://link.springer.com/chapter/10.1007%2F978-1-4419-7756-4_38
[2]https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/19674905/
[3] https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/15713033/
[4]https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/22431070/
[5]https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1044579X15000164?via%3Dihub

Lemongrass is a tropical plant indigenous to Southeast Asia, now grown around the world. Lemongrass has antifungal, antibacterial, and anti-inflammatory properties. It has traditionally been to reduce pain and fever. 

The plant is a rich source of flavonoids and phenolic compounds. Lemongrass contains several antioxidants, which can help scavenge free radicals in your body that may cause disease. Some important antioxidants it contains are chlorogenic acid and isoorientin.[1]

Lemongrass contains quercetin, a flavonoid known for having antioxidant and anti-inflammatory benefits. Quercetin decreases inflammation, which inhibits cancer cell growth and prevents heart disease. Lemongrass is used in Africa to treat coronary heart disease because of its ability to reduce high cholesterol. 

The herb also contains iron, calcium, and vitamin C. Iron is an essential component of hemoglobin, an important substance that moves oxygen from your lungs to your blood.[2]

Lemongrass has shown antifungal and anti-inflammatory effects when applied topically.[3]

Lemongrass can also help with many stomach and digestive issues. For example, it can combat infection, relieve stomach pain, and protect the stomach lining. 

Interactions  – There are no known interactions with Lemongrass.

[1]https://www.researchgate.net/publication/7938611_Free_Radical_Scavengers_and_Antioxidants_from_Lemongrass_Cymbopogon_citratus_DC_Stapf
[2]https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3217679/
[3]https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4170112/

Oregano means ‘joy of the mountain’ in Ancient Greek. It is part of the mint family. When it blooms it has purple and pink flowers that are edible as well as beautiful. The Ancient Greek believed that if you anointed yourself in Oregano leaf oil, you would dream of your future spouse. Whether this is true or just folk lore, the ancients also knew that the herb has many medicinal benefits. 

Widely used as a culinary herb and as an essential oil, Oregano leaf is high in antioxidants; is antibacterial, antiviral, and antiseptic. 

Oregano leaf is chock full of antioxidants which fight disease-causing free radicals. It is helping in fighting bacteria, parasites, and viruses. Oregano leaf is especially high in carvacrol and thymol – both strong antioxidants that decrease the activity of viruses. Thymol is especially antibacterial and antifungal.[1]

Oregano leaf’s high antioxidant levels make it very helpful in combating health issues relating to inflammation. This high antioxidant level can also combat cancer.[2]

Oregano leaf  is considered antiseptic, making it useful for mouth disease such as gingivitis. 

Interactions – Lithium

Oregano might have an effect like a water pill or “diuretic.” Taking oregano might decrease how well the body gets rid of lithium. This could increase how much lithium is in the body and result in serious side effects. Talk with your healthcare provider before using this product if you are taking lithium. 

[1]https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/abs/pii/S0308814616306392
[2]https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/19373612/

Turmeric is a plant that is part of the Ginger family and is native to southeast Asia. It is a rhizome, meaning it has an extensive underground stem system. Its stem (root) is a common spice and is a primary ingredient in curry powder. Turmeric root is also well known for its medicinal purposes. Curcumin is the principal active ingredient in Turmeric root. It has strong anti-inflammatory effects and is a powerful antioxidant.

Curcumin and other chemicals in Turmeric root might decrease swelling caused by inflammation. Chronic inflammation leads to many common health conditions. Curcumin can suppress many molecules known to play significant roles in inflammation. Turmeric root can be taken to treat a variety of ailments caused by inflammation. For example, Arthritis is a common disorder characterized by joint inflammation. Many studies show that curcumin can help treat symptoms of Arthritis and is, in some cases, more effective than anti-inflammatory drugs.[1] 

Turmeric root is an antioxidant. The effects of which are so powerful that they may stop the liver from being damaged by harmful toxins, such as long-term use of heavy pharmaceutical medications.[2] 

Turmeric root is used in Ayurvedic medicine as a digestive healing agent. More studies are now being done in the western world on how Turmeric can help with digestive issues such as gut inflammation and gut permeability.[3]

Turmeric root is thought to protect against degenerative diseases like Alzheimer’s. The curcumin it contains boosts the brain-derived neurotrophic factor hormones

(BDNF) levels, a protein found in the brain and spinal cord that plays a crucial role in keeping nerve cells healthy and communicating.[4] As common brain disorders like Alzheimer’s are associated with lower levels of BDNF, Turmeric root may help delay or reverse brain degeneration.[5]

Curcumin can kill several different kinds of cancer cells in multiple ways. Curcumin targets only cancer cells, leaving healthy cells unaffected. This is an essential step in future treatment because chemotherapy drugs kill both healthy cells and cancer cells.[6]

It is thought that Turmeric can help fight depression for several reasons. Chronic inflammation has been linked to depression and is one reason Turmeric can be used to treat it. It is also thought that the curcumin in Tuermic can affect serotonin and dopamine levels, the brain chemicals, and control mood and behavior. It can also affect the parts of the brain that respond to stress. 

Interactions – Anticoagulants

Turmeric might slow blood clotting. Taking Turmeric along with medications that also slow clotting might increase the chances of bruising and bleeding. Some medications that slow blood clotting include aspirin, clopidogrel (Plavix), diclofenac (Voltaren, Cataflam, others), ibuprofen (Advil, Motrin, others), naproxen (Anaprox, Naprosyn, others), dalteparin (Fragmin), enoxaparin (Lovenox), heparin, warfarin (Coumadin), and others.

[1]https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/19678780/
[2]https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/27561811/
[3]https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/27261998/
[4]https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/abs/pii/0896627391902733
[5]https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3281036/
[6]https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2758121/

Dose

1250mg, 2500mg

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